Residential and Commercial > State Code Status: Missouri

State Code Status: Missouri


Missouri does not have a mandatory statewide energy code. For a list of jurisdictional energy code adoptions, please click here.

Current Commercial Code

Due to its history of strong local government, Missouri does not have a mandatory statewide energy code. However, however all local jurisdictions except class III counties have the right to adopt an energy code. As expected, this system creates a sometimes confusing patchwork of different codes throughout the state.

All new state construction, buildings being constructed for lease by the state, and significant renovations and replacement of energy-using equipment shall be at least as stringent as the most recent energy efficiency standards of the IECC. Exemptions shall be limited to those listed in the IECC and exemptions approved by the Director of Facilities Management, Design and Construction.

Current Residential Code

Missouri has no mandatory or voluntary statewide energy code for private residential construction.

Read more about:

Missouri climate zones

Climate Zones: 4A, 5A


Code Adoption and Change Process

Code Change Process

Legislative: In Missouri, only the General Assembly is authorized to enact legislation to establish statewide building construction regulations and/or authorize a state agency to do so. However, there currently is no state regulatory agency authorized to promulgate, adopt, or update construction codes on a statewide basis.

Missouri has considered adopting a state code previously. For example, SB 745, drafted by BCAP in 2010, would have adopted the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 statewide. It also would have directed DNR to establish an automatic review cycle, either every three years or within nine months of the publication of a new model code version. In addition, HB 938 in 2011 would have implemented the energy provisions of the 2006 IRC. Both bills, however, failed to move past the committee stage.

Code Change Cycle

All local jurisdictions except class III counties have the right to adopt an energy code.

Missouri communities tend to adopt codes on a six-year cycle rather than following the three-year ICC development cycle. It is also typical for communities to follow the code adoption of surrounding communities. These adoption practices have developed two trends in Missouri; eastern Missouri communities are generally on the 2003 I-Codes and are moving/have moved to the 2009 I-Codes and western Missouri communities are generally on the 2006 I-Codes and are moving to the 2012 I-Codes.

Next Code Update

St. Louis County is considering adoption of the 2015 IECC.

See which counties have adopted an energy code:
County Building Codes for Missouri

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History

October 2015

Missouri releases its Comprehensive Statewide Energy Plan, which includes recommendations for statewide building codes.

2015

St. Louis County continues work on building code updates, considering the 2015 edition of the IECC.

February 17, 2010

A bill (HB 2183) is introduced in the Missouri State House that would set minimum requirements for all new construction, residential and commercial. This bill would:

  • Set minimum requirements for new and renovated commercial buildings to latest version of ASHRAE 90.1 and the IECC
  • Establish no later than August 28, 2011

This bill dies in the House during the spring of 2010.

January 14, 2010

House Bill 1667 is introduced to the Missouri State General Assembly. This legislation would establish a minimum statewide energy code for residential and commercial construction and renovation. This bill dies in the House in March 2010.

January 12, 2010

Senate Bill 745 is introduced. This legislation would would create provisions pertaining to environmentally sustainable construction for state-funded buildings. This bill dies in the Senate in March 2010.

April 23, 2009

The governor signs Executive Order 09-18, which requires that all new state construction, buildings being constructed for lease by the state, and significant renovations and replacement of energy-using equipment shall be at least as stringent as the most recent energy efficiency standards of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Exemptions are limited to those listed in the IECC and exemptions approved by the Director of Facilities Management, Design and Construction.

July 10, 2008

Governor Matt Blunt signs SB 1181 into law, requiring the Department of Natural Resources to establish minimum energy efficiency standards for state buildings, based on the latest version of the IECC (2006 at the time of enactment). SB 1181, effective January 1, 2009, applies to both new and renovated state-owned construction. The Commissioner of the Office of Administration may exempt any state building from meeting the minimum energy efficiency standard requirement for safety reasons or when the cost of compliance is expected to exceed the energy cost savings.

The state of Missouri passes a wide-ranging package of energy efficiency initiatives during the summer of 2008, including homeowner tax incentives.

January 26, 1996

In response to legislation signed in 1993, for Energy Efficiency in State Facilities, a rule is finalized and published with an effective date 30 days later that establishes “state building minimum efficiency standards.” The rule covers new state buildings (or portions), additions, substantial renovations, or existing buildings considered for lease (when over 10,000 sq. ft.) or acquisition by the state. ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-1989 is adopted by reference for buildings other than single-family and multi-family residential buildings not over three stories high. For single-family and multi-family residential buildings, the latest editions of the Council of American Building Officials Model Energy Code (MEC) or ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 90.2-1993 are applicable. New editions/revisions to these adopted standards are automatically adopted by reference and become effective three months after the date of their publication. (10 CSR 140-7, Department of Natural Resources.) No statewide requirements exist for other buildings; local cities and jurisdictions continue to adopt their own requirements.

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State Toolkit

This feature allows users to track progress towards goals of adoption, compliance, and implementation in their state. If you have any updates about strides that your state has made in any of the categories below, please contact BCAP.

The Missouri toolkit is currently under construction.

 


Contacts

Barbara J. Meyer
Energy Engineer
Missouri Department of Economic Development
Division of Energy

Email: barbara.meyer@ded.mo.gov

Isaac Elnecave
Senior Policy Manager
Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA)
Email: ielnecave@mwalliance.org


News and Events

BCAP Resources

Helpful Links

Basic Facts

Population: 6,083,672 (US Census Bureau, 2015)

Construction Activity:
New Privately Owned Housing Units Authorized by Permit Type (US Census Construction Statistics)

Year 2014 2015
Total Units 16,003 18,344
1 unit 9,072 10,339
2 units 460 510
3 or 4 units 462 507
5 or more units 6,009 6,988

CO2 Emissions:

Commercial buildings: 4.3 MMT
Residential buildings: 6.7 MMT
(EIA, 2015)

Energy data:

Residential building energy consumption:
491.1 trillion BTU in 2012

Commercial building energy consumption:
397.6 trillion BTU in 2012

Energy expenditures: $26.1 billion in 2012

Energy snapshot: According to EIA's 2009 state brief, Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per home per year, 12% more than the national average. Average household energy costs are relatively low; this is primarily attributed to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state.

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This page was last modified on: February 13, 2017