Code Status: District of Columbia

Code Status: District of Columbia


Current Commercial Code

2013 DC Construction Codes
Based on the 2012 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2010
Passed 3/20/2014, effective 3/28/2014

✔ Can use COMcheck to show compliance.

Current Residential Code

2013 DC Construction Codes
Based on the 2012 IECC with minor amendments
Passed 3/20/2014, effective 3/28/2014

✔ Can use REScheck to show compliance.

Green Code

2013 DC Green Construction Code, based on the 2012 International Green Construction Code (IgCC) as amended by the District of Columbia 2013 Green Construction Code Supplement
Adopted 3/28/2014
Green Building Permit Process

District of Columbia climate zones

Climate Zone: 4A


Code Adoption and Change Process

Code Change Process

Regulatory and legislative: The DC Construction Codes Coordinating Board advises the mayor and DC government on all matters pertaining to the DC building codes. This board meet regularly throughout the year. The DC City Council has to give the final approval for all proposed code changes.

Code Change Cycle

Codes are usually reviewed every three years with the publication of the new editions of the model code. The D.C. Green Building Act of 2006 requires that updated building codes be submitted to the City Council by January 1, 2010 and again every three years thereafter. The Act requires that codes “shall incorporate as many green building practices as practicable.”

Next Code Update

In October 2015, the Construction Codes Coordinating Board (CCCB) commenced a new code development cycle to review the 2015 I-codes.


History

March 28, 2014

The D.C. Council adopts 11 of the 2012 I-Codes and the NFPA’s 2011 NEC with changes, deletions, and/or additions set forth in the 2013 Construction Codes Supplement, 12 DCMR, Subtitles A through L.

March 26th Press Release: District of Columbia to Publish New Construction Codes

January 3, 2013

Mayor Vincent C. Gray announces that the District of Columbia has proposed to adopt the suite of 2012 I-codes. The District is also proposing to adopt its first Green Construction Code, which would be mandatory for all commercial projects greater than 10,000 square feet and all multi-family residential construction four stories or larger. Adoption of the Green Construction Code is a significant step towards meeting the Sustainable DC goals of the District having state-of-the-art sustainable building requirements.

On January 16th, Mayor Gray signs the Sustainable DC Act of 2012 in preparation for the release of his full sustainability plan, Sustainable DC.

February 2, 2012

Mayor Vincent C. Gray announces that the District of Columbia will be introducing the 2012 I-codes by March 1, 2013, leapfrogging over the 2009 editions to review and adopt more recent requirements, which will keep the District at the national forefront of sustainable building practices for all new and renovated residential and commercial buildings.

The 2012 I-Codes are to be reviewed and amended by the Construction Codes Coordinating Board (CCCB) through regular meetings that are open to the public before their publication.

Read the Energy Efficient Codes Coalition (EECC) press release.

December 16, 2011

The CCCB votes in favor of adopting the 2012 IECC. Implementation is expected by late 2013 pending administrative review and legislative processes to officially enact the code update.

December 2, 2008

The D.C. City Council adopts new residential and commercial building codes that incorporate many energy efficiency and green building standards. The new codes become effective immediately upon publication in the D.C. Register on December 26, 2008, but contain a one-year transition period during which building permit applications may use either the new code or the previous code.

Replacing the previous code based on the 2000 IECC, the 2008 D.C. Construction Codes were developed from ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings (about 7% more stringent than the standard in place for neighboring Virginia and Maryland) and the “30% Solution” for residential buildings (30% energy savings above the 2006 IECC, or about 30% more stringent than the standard in place for Virginia and Maryland), which was a comprehensive package of amendments offered at the 2009 International Code Council hearings in September.

The new codes also contain several greening amendments recommended by the D.C. Green Building Advisory Council (GBAC), including (among others) cool roofs, on-site storm water retention, and low-flow residential and commercial plumbing fixtures.

December 5, 2006

The D.C. City Council unanimously passes the D.C. Green Building Act of 2006, according to which the Mayor is to submit a comprehensive set of green building standards by January 2008. These standards are not only expected to include the provisions of the 2006 IECC; starting in 2012, they are expected to require all commercial development of 50,000 square feet or more to qualify for LEED certification. The Act also requires that updated building codes be submitted to the City Council by January 1, 2010 and again every three years thereafter. The Act requires that codes “shall incorporate as many green building practices as practicable.”

January 9, 2004

The 2000 IECC (without amendments) takes effect.

 


Contacts

David Epley
Green Building Program Manager
Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs
Email: david.epley@dc.gov

Bill Updike
Branch Chief
Department of Energy and Environment
Email: william.updike@dc.gov

Carolyn Sarno Goldthwaite
Senior Program Manager
High Performance Buildings
Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP)
Email: cgoldthwaite@neep.org


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